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Home / Garden Ideas /

Garden Ideas for July


Main image for garden idea article

Looking for ideas for what to do in the garden in July? Well, look no further as we have compiled a list of garden jobs to keep you busy throughout the month.

How to take softwood cuttings


Many plants can be propagated in summer from the new growth made during the current season, before it begins to harden. These are known as softwood or soft-tip cuttings.

The difficulty rating for this garden job is 3 out of 5 and you will need: Secateurs, rooting hormone powder, pot, compost, cover

Step One:

Remove a healthy shoot from the plant you wish to propagate. Take a tip cutting about 10cm long, cutting just below a leaf joint where the concentration of natural rooting hormones is highest. You can also take cuttings from the rest of the shoot, without the tip.

Step 1 of 4How to take softwood cuttings

Step Two:

Remove the leaves from the lower one third of the cutting. They may rot if they are in contact with damp compost and could infect the cuttings.

Step 2 of 4How to take softwood cuttings

Step Three:

Dip the base of the cutting in clean, fresh rooting powder and tap off any excess. Push the cutting into moist, sterile cuttings compost. You can fit several in a pot.

Step 3 of 4How to take softwood cuttings

Step Four:

Cover with a propagator lid, plastic bag or improvised cover like this drinks bottle. Place in a well-lit spot out of direct sun. Keep moist. Roots should begin to emerge in 6-8 weeks, when the cuttings can be gently removed and potted separately.

Step 4 of 4How to take softwood cuttings

How to protect plants from heat


The intense heat of summer can cause problems, like scorch, for the plants in a greenhouse but there are a few easy ways to help them.

The difficulty rating for this garden job is 1 out of 5 and you will need: Newspaper, Shading Paint, Brush, Watering Can, Horticultural Fleece or Netting

Step One:

Lay newspaper over cuttings or young plants to shade them from direct sunlight.

Step 1 of 4How to protect plants from heat

Step Two:

Apply shading paint to the panels of your greenhouse. Apply thinly, adding more if necessary.

Step 2 of 4How to protect plants from heat

Step Three:

Damping down the floor with cold water increases humidity and lowers the temperature as it evaporates.

Step 3 of 4How to protect plants from heat

Step Four:

Horticultural fleece or shade netting can be draped over plants or the outisde of the structure. Follow these steps whenever the heat is particulary intense to help stop your plants suffering.

Step 4 of 4How to protect plants from heat

How to water when on Holiday


Going on holiday means that you will not be able to water your plants. This might not be an issue for plants in borders but can prove a real problem for plants in containers.

The difficulty rating for this garden job is 1 out of 5 and you will need: Tray, Plastic Bag, Watering Can, Spade

Step One:

Stand large pots in watertight bin liners and water them well.

Step 1 of 4How to water when on Holiday

Step Two:

Tie the bag loosely to reduce evaporation.

Step 2 of 4How to water when on Holiday

Step Three:

Plunge pots in the borders. This allows plants to draw up water from the surrounding soil as well as keeping the roots shaded and cool.

Step 3 of 4How to water when on Holiday

Step Four:

Place houseplants in a shallow tray with a small amount of water in the base. Grouping plants together traps hudmidity underneath the leaves reducing water stress.

Step 4 of 4How to water when on Holiday

How to take Begonia Cuttings


There are several different types of Begonia, all with attractive, colourful flowers. Taking leaf cuttings is an easy way to propagate your plants and increase their numbers.

The difficulty rating for this garden job is 2 out of 5 and you will need: Knife, Board, Pebbles, Pots, Cuttings Compost, Plastic Bag, Tie

Step One:

Use a clean, sharp knife to remove a strong, healthy leaf from the mother plant. Work carefully so you do not damage the rest of the plant.

Step 1 of 4How to take Begonia Cuttings

Step Two:

Lay the leaf face-down on a board and make short cuts through the main veins on the underside of the leaf with the tip of the knife.

Step 2 of 4How to take Begonia Cuttings

Step Three:

Lay the leaf right-side up on the surface of moist, fresh, sterile cuttings compost in a wide pot. Use small pebbles to keep the whole leaf in contact with the compost.

Step 3 of 4How to take Begonia Cuttings

Step Four:

Seal the whole pot inside an opaque plastic bag to ensure high humidity around the leaf. Place it on a well lit windowsill, out of direct sunlight. Check it regularly to make sure the compost does not dry out or the leaf rot. After 10-14 days the bag can be removed. Small new plants will begin to form where the leaf was cut. These can be transferred into individual pots as soon as they are large enough.

Step 4 of 4How to take Begonia Cuttings

How to Divide Hemerocallis


As they age, Hemerocallis plants (day lilies) become congested and the flower size gets smaller. At this stage, they benefit from lifting and dividing to get rid of the oldest parts of the clump and replant the younger, healthy parts.

The difficulty rating for this garden job is 3 out of 5 and you will need: Garden forks, Gloves, Worksheet, Secateurs, Hand trowel, Fertiliser

Step One:

Lift the entire clump of plants if you can. Shake off the loose soil and lay the clump on a worksheet. Push two garden forks into the middle of the clump, back-to-back and spread them apart to split the clump.

Step 1 of 4How to Divide Hemerocallis

Step Two:

Work through the clump, keeping the parts with strong roots and healthy shoots. Discard the oldest, most woody parts of the roots.

Step 2 of 4How to Divide Hemerocallis

Step Three:

In order to reduce the stress on the parts of the plant you intend to keep, reduce the length of the leaves by two thirds. Having less leaf area to supply with water means the roots can use their energy to re-establish the plant.

Step 3 of 4How to Divide Hemerocallis

Step Four:

Once you have decided how much of the clump you are keeping, replant the shoots. Give them plenty of room to grow and apply fertiliser around them, forking it lightly into the soil surface and watering well to settle the soil and ash the feed down towards the root zone.

Step 4 of 4How to Divide Hemerocallis

How to take semi-ripe cuttings


As the season progresses, the new shoots on shrubs start to become brown (woody) instead of green. At this point, they can be taken as semi-ripe cuttings. The extra strength means that the cuttings are less likely to wilt before they produce roots.

The difficulty rating for this garden job is 3 out of 5 and you will need: Plant material, Secateurs or Knife, Rooting Powder, Pot, Compost, Cover

Step One:

The ideal cutting from a plant, such as this rosemary, should be 8- 10cm long with 1-2cm of brown stem at the base. The shoot can be cut with clean, sharp secateurs or pulled from the stem with a ‘heel’ of bark attached.

Step 1 of 4How to take semi-ripe cuttings

Step Two:

Remove the leaves from the lower third of the cutting by pulling gently. If you have taken the cutting with a heel, trim it back to remove the thin tail.

Step 2 of 4How to take semi-ripe cuttings

Step Three:

Dip the end of the cutting in clean rooting hormone powder and tap off the excess. Never put used powder back into its container: just tip enough to use in one go into a saucer and then discard it.

Step 3 of 4How to take semi-ripe cuttings

Step Four:

Push the cuttings into a pot of multipurpose compost, water to settle and allow to drain. They will root outdoors or in a cool greenhouse. A cover will help protect them from excess rain as well as increasing humidity around the leaves to speed rooting. Check regularly for watering, as the compost needs to be moist.

Step 4 of 4How to take semi-ripe cuttings

How to feed your plants


It is very easy to think that just putting a plant in the garden means it can fend for itself forever, but soil is a variable medium and may not contain enough nutrients, particularly if it has been untended for a while.

The difficulty rating for this garden job is 1 out of 5 and you will need: Fertiliser, Hosepipe, Watering can

Step One:

Where you have established plants like shrubs or fruit, a controlled-release fertiliser will feed them throughout the season. Fork it lightly into the surface of the soil, as it works in moist, dark conditions. Water the soil if there is no rain within 25 hours.

Step 1 of 4How to feed your plants

Step Two:

Liquid feed applied through a hose-end distributor is ideal if you have little access to the soil. It is quick-acting and will give flowering plants a boost.

Step 2 of 4How to feed your plants

Step Three:

Tomato food is a good source of Potassium, which aids flowering and fruiting of all plants, not just tomatoes. Only apply the recommended dose, measured carefully into the watering can.

Step 3 of 4How to feed your plants

Step Four:

Your plants will flower for longer, with bigger and more colourful blooms, if they are well-fed. They will also have a greater resistance to pest or disease attack.

Step 4 of 4How to feed your plants

How to repair a lawn - Patches


Even the best lawns sometimes suffer localised damage. It might be caused by a pet, moss, birds scratching or something left standing on the lawn for too long and killing off the grass. By acting quickly, you can replace the lost grass plants and help your lawn look lovely again.

The difficulty rating for this garden job is 2 out of 5 and you will need: Spring-tined Rake, Grass Seed, Compost, Horticultural Fleece, Canes

Step One:

Use a spring-tined rake to comb through the grass, removing any debris and making the blades stand upright so you have access to the soil.

Step 1 of 4How to repair a lawn - Patches

Step Two:

Mix the grass seed with some moist multipurpose compost in a pot to give the seedlings an easy medium to begin rooting into. Scatter generously over the area.

Step 2 of 4How to repair a lawn - Patches

Step Three:

Birds love grass seed and will eat it all if you let them. A small piece of horticultural fleece will keep them off while still allowing light to reach the seedlings.

Step 3 of 4How to repair a lawn - Patches

Step Four:

Hold the fleece in place with short canes. In summer, the seed should germinate within days and the cover can be removed after about a week.

Step 4 of 4How to repair a lawn - Patches

How to turf a lawn


Laying turf to create a lawn gives an instant effect and laying it properly means it will be easier to look after for years to come. Seek out good quality turf, preferably from a specialist and choose a time when the weather is mild and the soil warm.

The difficulty rating for this garden job is 3 out of 5 and you will need: Spade, rake, turf, board.

Step One:

A good lawn is a long-term project, so start with a good base. Good drainage is essential, so dig over (if necessary) to loosen the soil, then rake to level it and remove stones. Add fertiliser and rake lightly into the soil.

Step 1 of 4How to turf a lawn

Step Two:

Starting at the furthest point, unroll the turf and lay it along a straight edge. It should be green and healthy-looking, not yellow.

Step 2 of 4How to turf a lawn

Step Three:

Lay brick-pattern, so the joints are staggered and press firmly so each roll is in good contact with the soil beneath.

Step 3 of 4How to turf a lawn

Step Four:

Use a board to firm the grass and save damaging it or creating depressions. Work loose soil into the joints to help the turves knit together quickly. Water well after laying to stop the turf drying and shrinking.

Step 4 of 4How to turf a lawn

How to: New orchids from old


Moth orchids (Phaelenopsis) vary slightly in their flowering habit. Some produce another batch of flower buds at the tip of the current flowering stem, while others produce side shoots from lower down the stem, especially if you cut the stem back. Occasionally, instead of flower buds, a miniature plant is produced, known as a Keiki (Hawaiian for baby).

The difficulty rating for this garden job is 2 out of 5 and you will need: Secateurs, pot, orchid compost, plastic bag, rubber band.

Step One:

If your plant does not produce more buds at the tip of the flowering shoot, trim it back to just above the top stem bud.

Step 1 of 4How to: New orchids from old

Step Two:

Instead of a flowering shoot, you may get a new plant forming, known as a Keiki.

Step 2 of 4How to: New orchids from old

Step Three:

Once this has grown roots, it can be removed from the parent plant. Take a short section of stem with it, as this helps anchor it into a pot of compost.

Step 3 of 4How to: New orchids from old

Step Four:

Pot it into moist orchid compost and cover with a plastic bag, held in place with a rubber band to keep it humid while it establishes. Within a few weeks, it should begin to grow and can be treated the same as other orchids.

Step 4 of 4How to: New orchids from old

How to: Maintenance Pruning


On ornamental plants (not fruit) there are a few basic reasons why you should prune, best remembered as the 4 Ds: Dead, Dying, Damaged and Diseased. Next, remove crossing or rubbing branches, any that have reverted to green and for shape.

The difficulty rating for this garden job is 2 out of 5 and you will need: Secateurs, pruning saw

Step One:

Dead wood is easiest to see and remove in summer. Cut back to healthy, pale-coloured wood.

Step 1 of 4How to: Maintenance Pruning

Step Two:

Die-back is common after early pruning where a rogue frost can catch you out. Cut back to just above a healthy bud.

Step 2 of 4How to: Maintenance Pruning

Step Three:

Larger dead stems should be removed with a pruning saw, working very carefully so you do not damage nearby shoots.

Step 3 of 4How to: Maintenance Pruning

Step Four:

Green shoots on a variegated plant should be removed, as they contain more chlorophyll and are stronger. If left, they will take over and you will lose the variegation.

Step 4 of 4How to: Maintenance Pruning

How to make a Herb Planter


You can use old pots to make an attractive herb planter which will provide interest for your garden and food for your kitchen.

The difficulty rating for this garden job is 1 out of 5 and you will need: Pots, Multipurpose Compost, Herbs, Watering Can

Step One:

Line the base of the the largest pot with newspaper to prevent compost washing out and insects crawling in.

Step 1 of 4How to make a Herb Planter

Step Two:

Fill the largest pot with compost and place the next pot within it. Sink the smaller pot so that it is half submerged within the compost.

Step 2 of 4How to make a Herb Planter

Step Three:

Repeat the previous step for the final pot and then fill it with compost. Make sure the posts are stable and level.

Step 3 of 4How to make a Herb Planter

Step Four:

Carefully pull each pot away from the herb plant. Plant them evenly within the container and make sure you leave space for them to grow. Gently water in the plants to settle them and place your new display in a sheltered part of the garden.

Step 4 of 4How to make a Herb Planter

How to take softwood cuttings


Many plants can be propagated in summer from the new growth made during the current season, before it begins to harden. These are known as softwood or soft-tip cuttings.

The difficulty rating for this garden job is 3 out of 5 and you will need: Secateurs, rooting hormone powder, pot, compost, cover

Step One:

Remove a healthy shoot from the plant you wish to propagate. Take a tip cutting about 10cm long, cutting just below a leaf joint where the concentration of natural rooting hormones is highest. You can also take cuttings from the rest of the shoot, without the tip.

Step 1 of 4How to take softwood cuttings

Step Two:

Remove the leaves from the lower one third of the cutting. They may rot if they are in contact with damp compost and could infect the cuttings.

Step 2 of 4How to take softwood cuttings

Step Three:

Dip the base of the cutting in clean, fresh rooting powder and tap off any excess. Push the cutting into moist, sterile cuttings compost. You can fit several in a pot.

Step 3 of 4How to take softwood cuttings

Step Four:

Cover with a propagator lid, plastic bag or improvised cover like this drinks bottle. Place in a well-lit spot out of direct sun. Keep moist. Roots should begin to emerge in 6-8 weeks, when the cuttings can be gently removed and potted separately.

Step 4 of 4How to take softwood cuttings

How to protect plants from heat


The intense heat of summer can cause problems, like scorch, for the plants in a greenhouse but there are a few easy ways to help them.

The difficulty rating for this garden job is 1 out of 5 and you will need: Newspaper, Shading Paint, Brush, Watering Can, Horticultural Fleece or Netting

Step One:

Lay newspaper over cuttings or young plants to shade them from direct sunlight.

Step 1 of 4How to protect plants from heat

Step Two:

Apply shading paint to the panels of your greenhouse. Apply thinly, adding more if necessary.

Step 2 of 4How to protect plants from heat

Step Three:

Damping down the floor with cold water increases humidity and lowers the temperature as it evaporates.

Step 3 of 4How to protect plants from heat

Step Four:

Horticultural fleece or shade netting can be draped over plants or the outisde of the structure. Follow these steps whenever the heat is particulary intense to help stop your plants suffering.

Step 4 of 4How to protect plants from heat

How to water when on Holiday


Going on holiday means that you will not be able to water your plants. This might not be an issue for plants in borders but can prove a real problem for plants in containers.

The difficulty rating for this garden job is 1 out of 5 and you will need: Tray, Plastic Bag, Watering Can, Spade

Step One:

Stand large pots in watertight bin liners and water them well.

Step 1 of 4How to water when on Holiday

Step Two:

Tie the bag loosely to reduce evaporation.

Step 2 of 4How to water when on Holiday

Step Three:

Plunge pots in the borders. This allows plants to draw up water from the surrounding soil as well as keeping the roots shaded and cool.

Step 3 of 4How to water when on Holiday

Step Four:

Place houseplants in a shallow tray with a small amount of water in the base. Grouping plants together traps hudmidity underneath the leaves reducing water stress.

Step 4 of 4How to water when on Holiday

How to protect against birds


There is nothing more frustrating than losing a crop to birds after all the time and hard work you have invested in it. They seem to know when fruit is ready before anyone else, so it is worth taking precautions against attack.

The difficulty rating for this garden job is 1 out of 5 and you will need: Netting, Pop-up Cover, Chicken Wire, CDs

Step One:

A roll of netting is vital if you realise a crop is in danger. Simply lay it over the plants and secure it in place with clothes pegs.

Step 1 of 4How to protect against birds

Step Two:

For a single plant or a short row, a pop-up cover is ideal. These fold flat and pack away when not in use.

Step 2 of 4How to protect against birds

Step Three:

For a larger area, it is worth using chicken wire and canes to construct a cage with netting over the top.

Step 3 of 4How to protect against birds

Step Four:

Old CDs are useful to scare birds as the sun catches them and they shine. Birds are always alert to attack as they feed, so anything that disturbs them can be used to protect your plants.

Step 4 of 4How to protect against birds

How to make the most of your dahlias


When it comes to stunning colour and flower size in the summer, Dahlias perform brilliantly. With a little care and attention, you can have blooms that will be the envy of your neighbours.

The difficulty rating for this garden job is 1 out of 5 and you will need: Pot, Straw, Cane, Secateurs

Step One:

Earwigs love Dahlias and will feast on the flowers, leaving notches in the petals and mess everywhere. They feed at night and hide during the day, making them hard to remove. Create a trap by filling a pot with dry straw…

Step 1 of 4How to make the most of your dahlias

Step Two:

…and placing it upside down on the top of a cane right next to the plant. The earwigs will hide in the straw and you can simply empty the pot each day to get rid of them.

Step 2 of 4How to make the most of your dahlias

Step Three:

If you want really big blooms, remove competing flower buds from nearby on the same stem.

Step 3 of 4How to make the most of your dahlias

Step Four:

Remove flowers as they fade. This stops the plant setting seed, which will reduce flowering, and reduces the risk of grey mould as the petals rot.

Step 4 of 4How to make the most of your dahlias

How to Divide Hemerocallis


As they age, Hemerocallis plants (day lilies) become congested and the flower size gets smaller. At this stage, they benefit from lifting and dividing to get rid of the oldest parts of the clump and replant the younger, healthy parts.

The difficulty rating for this garden job is 3 out of 5 and you will need: Garden forks, Gloves, Worksheet, Secateurs, Hand trowel, Fertiliser

Step One:

Lift the entire clump of plants if you can. Shake off the loose soil and lay the clump on a worksheet. Push two garden forks into the middle of the clump, back-to-back and spread them apart to split the clump.

Step 1 of 4How to Divide Hemerocallis

Step Two:

Work through the clump, keeping the parts with strong roots and healthy shoots. Discard the oldest, most woody parts of the roots.

Step 2 of 4How to Divide Hemerocallis

Step Three:

In order to reduce the stress on the parts of the plant you intend to keep, reduce the length of the leaves by two thirds. Having less leaf area to supply with water means the roots can use their energy to re-establish the plant.

Step 3 of 4How to Divide Hemerocallis

Step Four:

Once you have decided how much of the clump you are keeping, replant the shoots. Give them plenty of room to grow and apply fertiliser around them, forking it lightly into the soil surface and watering well to settle the soil and ash the feed down towards the root zone.

Step 4 of 4How to Divide Hemerocallis

How to take semi-ripe cuttings


As the season progresses, the new shoots on shrubs start to become brown (woody) instead of green. At this point, they can be taken as semi-ripe cuttings. The extra strength means that the cuttings are less likely to wilt before they produce roots.

The difficulty rating for this garden job is 3 out of 5 and you will need: Plant material, Secateurs or Knife, Rooting Powder, Pot, Compost, Cover

Step One:

The ideal cutting from a plant, such as this rosemary, should be 8- 10cm long with 1-2cm of brown stem at the base. The shoot can be cut with clean, sharp secateurs or pulled from the stem with a ‘heel’ of bark attached.

Step 1 of 4How to take semi-ripe cuttings

Step Two:

Remove the leaves from the lower third of the cutting by pulling gently. If you have taken the cutting with a heel, trim it back to remove the thin tail.

Step 2 of 4How to take semi-ripe cuttings

Step Three:

Dip the end of the cutting in clean rooting hormone powder and tap off the excess. Never put used powder back into its container: just tip enough to use in one go into a saucer and then discard it.

Step 3 of 4How to take semi-ripe cuttings

Step Four:

Push the cuttings into a pot of multipurpose compost, water to settle and allow to drain. They will root outdoors or in a cool greenhouse. A cover will help protect them from excess rain as well as increasing humidity around the leaves to speed rooting. Check regularly for watering, as the compost needs to be moist.

Step 4 of 4How to take semi-ripe cuttings

How to feed your plants


It is very easy to think that just putting a plant in the garden means it can fend for itself forever, but soil is a variable medium and may not contain enough nutrients, particularly if it has been untended for a while.

The difficulty rating for this garden job is 1 out of 5 and you will need: Fertiliser, Hosepipe, Watering can

Step One:

Where you have established plants like shrubs or fruit, a controlled-release fertiliser will feed them throughout the season. Fork it lightly into the surface of the soil, as it works in moist, dark conditions. Water the soil if there is no rain within 25 hours.

Step 1 of 4How to feed your plants

Step Two:

Liquid feed applied through a hose-end distributor is ideal if you have little access to the soil. It is quick-acting and will give flowering plants a boost.

Step 2 of 4How to feed your plants

Step Three:

Tomato food is a good source of Potassium, which aids flowering and fruiting of all plants, not just tomatoes. Only apply the recommended dose, measured carefully into the watering can.

Step 3 of 4How to feed your plants

Step Four:

Your plants will flower for longer, with bigger and more colourful blooms, if they are well-fed. They will also have a greater resistance to pest or disease attack.

Step 4 of 4How to feed your plants

How to turf a lawn


Laying turf to create a lawn gives an instant effect and laying it properly means it will be easier to look after for years to come. Seek out good quality turf, preferably from a specialist and choose a time when the weather is mild and the soil warm.

The difficulty rating for this garden job is 3 out of 5 and you will need: Spade, rake, turf, board.

Step One:

A good lawn is a long-term project, so start with a good base. Good drainage is essential, so dig over (if necessary) to loosen the soil, then rake to level it and remove stones. Add fertiliser and rake lightly into the soil.

Step 1 of 4How to turf a lawn

Step Two:

Starting at the furthest point, unroll the turf and lay it along a straight edge. It should be green and healthy-looking, not yellow.

Step 2 of 4How to turf a lawn

Step Three:

Lay brick-pattern, so the joints are staggered and press firmly so each roll is in good contact with the soil beneath.

Step 3 of 4How to turf a lawn

Step Four:

Use a board to firm the grass and save damaging it or creating depressions. Work loose soil into the joints to help the turves knit together quickly. Water well after laying to stop the turf drying and shrinking.

Step 4 of 4How to turf a lawn

How to: New orchids from old


Moth orchids (Phaelenopsis) vary slightly in their flowering habit. Some produce another batch of flower buds at the tip of the current flowering stem, while others produce side shoots from lower down the stem, especially if you cut the stem back. Occasionally, instead of flower buds, a miniature plant is produced, known as a Keiki (Hawaiian for baby).

The difficulty rating for this garden job is 2 out of 5 and you will need: Secateurs, pot, orchid compost, plastic bag, rubber band.

Step One:

If your plant does not produce more buds at the tip of the flowering shoot, trim it back to just above the top stem bud.

Step 1 of 4How to: New orchids from old

Step Two:

Instead of a flowering shoot, you may get a new plant forming, known as a Keiki.

Step 2 of 4How to: New orchids from old

Step Three:

Once this has grown roots, it can be removed from the parent plant. Take a short section of stem with it, as this helps anchor it into a pot of compost.

Step 3 of 4How to: New orchids from old

Step Four:

Pot it into moist orchid compost and cover with a plastic bag, held in place with a rubber band to keep it humid while it establishes. Within a few weeks, it should begin to grow and can be treated the same as other orchids.

Step 4 of 4How to: New orchids from old

How to: Maintenance Pruning


On ornamental plants (not fruit) there are a few basic reasons why you should prune, best remembered as the 4 Ds: Dead, Dying, Damaged and Diseased. Next, remove crossing or rubbing branches, any that have reverted to green and for shape.

The difficulty rating for this garden job is 2 out of 5 and you will need: Secateurs, pruning saw

Step One:

Dead wood is easiest to see and remove in summer. Cut back to healthy, pale-coloured wood.

Step 1 of 4How to: Maintenance Pruning

Step Two:

Die-back is common after early pruning where a rogue frost can catch you out. Cut back to just above a healthy bud.

Step 2 of 4How to: Maintenance Pruning

Step Three:

Larger dead stems should be removed with a pruning saw, working very carefully so you do not damage nearby shoots.

Step 3 of 4How to: Maintenance Pruning

Step Four:

Green shoots on a variegated plant should be removed, as they contain more chlorophyll and are stronger. If left, they will take over and you will lose the variegation.

Step 4 of 4How to: Maintenance Pruning

We hope these projects have given you a few ideas and a bit of inspiration for what to do in your garden this month.

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